A Kwanzaa craft for kids: How to DIY an ear of corn from felt & yarn

A few years ago, the magazine Kids Crafts 1-2-3 (no longer published, sadly) asked us to make a craft for Kwanzaa. What is Kwanzaa? It’s a seven-day festival that starts on December 26 and celebrates African and African American culture. Different symbols are used to celebrate Kwanzaa, and one is an ear of corn. The corn represents the future and Native Americans, and families display one ear of corn for each child in the family. Designer Kathleen George created this Kwanzaa Corn Craft for families to make together.

A Kwanzaa craft that families can make together.  Tradition calls of one ear of corn for each child in the family. Tutorial on CraftsnCoffee.com.

Kwanzaa Corn Craft by Kathleen George.

To make a Kwanzaa Corn Craft, you will need:

  • STYROFOAM™ Brand Foam: 1” x 7” x 12” sheet (cut a larger, 1” x 12” x 36” sheet into several pieces for a group craft)
  • Acrylic craft paint, black
  • Thick yarn, yellow
  • Felt square, green
  • Thick, white craft glue
  • Optional: Ribbon for hanging
  • Tools needed: Scissors; 1” stiff paintbrush; straight pins; pencil; thin wooden skewer

 To make a Kwanzaa Corn Craft:

1. Paint black the front and sides of the 1” x 7” x 12” sheet of STYROFOAM Brand Foam. Let dry.

2. Position the corn cob pattern at an angle on the foam sheet and pin in place. Trace around the pattern with a pencil.

Detail of Kwanzaa corn. CraftsnCoffee.com

You’ll tuck in about a 1″ length of yarn every half inch or so. You want the yarn to pouf like kernels of corn.

  1. Tuck yarn around the outline first, and then fill in the center of the corn cob. Here’s how to tuck in the yarn:
  • Squeeze a very thin line of white craft glue, about 1” long, along the pencil outline.
  • Position one end of the yarn on the glue, and using the wood skewer, insert the end straight into the foam sheet.
  • Move about ¾” – 1” down the yarn strand, and tuck in the yarn again, about ½” from the first tuck. Don’t pull the yarn tight between the tucks – you want the excess yarn to create a small “pouf” like a corn kernel. Keeping the the yarn loose also helps hold the yarn in place; if you pull the yarn taut, it might pop out.
  • Continue tucking in yarn to complete the outline, adding a small amount of glue as you go. You can use the glue sparingly, as the foam will also grip the yarn in place.
  • Once the outline is complete, fill in the center with tucked yarn.
  •  If glue builds up on the skewer, wipe it off with a damp rag.

4. Cut three leaves from green felt.

  1. Glue on the center leaf first, positioning it so that the top can fold over. (Refer to photo.)
  1. Glue on two side leaves, slightly overlapping them in the middle.
  1. Optional: If you’d like to hang your Kwanzaa Corn, knot together the ends of a 6” – 8” length of ribbon. Pin and glue the knot to the back of the picture.
A Kwanzaa craft that families can make together. Tradition calls of one ear of corn for each child in the family. Tutorial on CraftsnCoffee.com.

The corn symbolizes the future and Native American culture.

If you’re curious, here’s more information about Kwanzaa and the seven symbols of Kwanzaa.

This would also be a good Thanksgiving craft for kids, so be sure to keep this project on file.

Do you celebrate Kwanzaa? If so, what are your Kwanzaa traditions?

P.S. Don’t forget about our celebratory giveaway!

Happy crafting.

Sharon

 

This entry was posted in Craft Tutorial, Fall Crafts, Kid's Crafts, Thanksgiving Crafts and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to A Kwanzaa craft for kids: How to DIY an ear of corn from felt & yarn

  1. Katiria says:

    I don’t celebrate Kwanzaa but this works as a Thanksgiving craft too. I will have to try it out

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